The Importance of Being Happy

The Importance of Being Happy

Here’s the thing: The happier I get, the less judgy I become.

It’s an important observation. Profoundly simple. Think about how unhappy people behave. Think about members of the Westboro Baptist Church, for example.

 

Not happy.

Not happy and spreading it.

Judgmental people aren’t happy people. Angry people aren’t happy people. Critical people aren’t happy people.

Now think about happy people and how they behave. They’re fun to be around. You feel safe with them. You laugh. You relax. That’s because happy people have self-acceptance and self-approval. When self-esteem is high, people are easy to get along with. These people are cheerful. They are secure, generous and tolerant. They take risks because they accept themselves. Like Ellen DeGeneres. She’s cheerful, generous and tolerant and not afraid of looking like a dork, and people love her for it.

 

Happy and spreading it.

In his book, How To Have Confidence and Power in Dealing with People, author Les Giblin says, “If you’re on good terms with yourself, you’re on good terms with others….every single instance where an individual is at odds with himself and at odds with other people has proved to be a problem in lack of true self-esteem, and that the cure, in every case, consists in restoring self-esteem. Once a person begins to like himself better, then he is able to like other people a little better. Once he gets over his painful dissatisfaction with himself, he is less critical and more tolerant of others.” Written in 1956, the book is full of old-fashioned advice, most of which still rings true today.

 

The-Happier-I-Get-The-Less-Judgy-I-Become

The importance of being happy.

Giblin goes on to say that, “A starved ego is a mean ego.” We’ve all dealt with folks whose egos were out of control, but what about those folks whose egos aren’t fed enough? So often we think of having an ego as a bad thing but really, a healthy ego equates with higher self-esteem and a more positive self-image. A lot of people are suffering from a lack of  self-esteem. They could do with a little more self-confidence — or “cha cha” as I call it.

So often we think of having an ego as a bad thing but really, a healthy ego equates with higher self-esteem.

What does poor self-esteem look like? Giblin says, “To the person with low self-esteem, even a critical look or a harsh word can seem like a calamity. The so-called ‘sensitive souls’ who see some ‘dig’ or double-meaning in even the most innocent remark are suffering from low self-esteem. The braggart, the show-off, and the blusterer are also suffering from low self-esteem.”

Feel good about yourself and you’ll feel better about others.

Feel good about others and people will enjoy being around you.

When people enjoy being around you, relationships become a lot more enjoyable.

Want more love in your life? Start with loving yourself more.

You’ll be happier.

For starters.

Love,

Sophie

Hey! Did you know you can download a sample chapter of my new book? It’s all about relationships and living together without growing apart – http://itsnotyouitsus.com/.

It’s Not You, It’s Us: A Guide for Living Together Without Growing Apart. Download Chapter

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Author Adele Frizzell/Sophie Winters

Sophie Winters is the author of two books on dating and relationships. Sophie’s real name is Adele Frizzell. She enjoys travel, hiking, and lifting heavy weights. She is a competitive bench presser, certified yoga teacher, and mountain addict. She loves inspiring people to get more out of life.

Her first book, The Cha Cha Club Dating Man-ifesto is written for all the single ladies, while her second relationship advice book, It’s Not You, It’s Us: A Guide for Living Together Without Growing Apart is for couples who want more joy, intimacy and respect in their relationship. She is working on her third book.


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